Tea and coffee, including Bulletproof Coffee, are completely ketogenic, with bonus points for jump-starting weight loss and focusing your mental clarity. Watch out for sweeteners, fillers, or artificial flavors. While you can drink unsweetened, plant-based milk alternatives in moderation without going out of ketosis, they are not Bulletproof, and are usually loaded with toxic molds — the exception being full-fat coconut milk.[4] If you plan to include them in your diet, beware of carrageenan and BPA-lined containers. 

The keto diet also appears to help induce autophagy, which helps clear damaged cells from the body, including senescent cells that serve no functional purpose but still linger inside tissues and organs. In animal studies when rats are put on the ketogenic diet, autophagic pathways are created that reduce brain injury during and after seizures. (21)
Hi Linda, The carb counts on product packaging is accurate (they have to be, to abide by U.S. laws), though they are sometimes rounded down to the nearest gram. If your goal is weight loss, for some people these products can cause a stall, but others tolerate them fine. I personally avoid packaged products as they tend to be highly processed and contain artificial ingredients, but have not looked at this one specifically. We are gluten-free so don’t buy products with wheat, but I am a strong believer in each person doing what works best for them!
Sure, they might fit the bill from a numbers perspective. (Cookies with 2 grams of carbs? Sign me up!) But like other snack foods, they’re basically void of nutrients. Plus, there’s a good chance they also contain some stuff you don’t want. “These snacks may be ultra-processed with artificial ingredients, sweeteners, or preservatives,” Nico says. Aside from the fact that artificial ingredients and preservatives are best avoided no matter what diet you’re on, hidden sweeteners could mess with your blood sugar and possibly take you out of ketosis.
Carbs in fruits and veggies do count, but you don’t add up the carbs and sugar. Sugar is already included in the carbs – it’s just listed separately on labels because some people want to see a breakdown of how much of the carbs are sugars (versus other, complex carbs). If it says 2g carbs and 2g sugar, it means there is 2g total carbs and all of them are sugar (in this case).
The low glycaemic index treatment (LGIT)[49] is an attempt to achieve the stable blood glucose levels seen in children on the classic ketogenic diet while using a much less restrictive regimen. The hypothesis is that stable blood glucose may be one of the mechanisms of action involved in the ketogenic diet,[9] which occurs because the absorption of the limited carbohydrates is slowed by the high fat content.[5] Although it is also a high-fat diet (with approximately 60% calories from fat),[5] the LGIT allows more carbohydrate than either the classic ketogenic diet or the modified Atkins diet, approximately 40–60 g per day.[18] However, the types of carbohydrates consumed are restricted to those that have a glycaemic index lower than 50. Like the modified Atkins diet, the LGIT is initiated and maintained at outpatient clinics and does not require precise weighing of food or intensive dietitian support. Both are offered at most centres that run ketogenic diet programmes, and in some centres they are often the primary dietary therapy for adolescents.[9]
These make an ideal snack or you can make them as hors-d’oeuvres for a party. They are packed with flavor and have lots of healthy fats. They are quick and easy to make and the fresh lime juice not only adds a citrus kick. It also keeps the avocado from turning brown. If you prefer, you can use turkey or ham, but the prosciutto adds a special touch as the saltiness goes well with the avocado and the lime. Try to use avocados that are not too ripe so they will be easier to cut into slices.
Thank you for such a through list. I have been wondering how to count the spices used in cooking and now I know. I do have one question though that I can not find the answer to. When breaking down the macros for a recipe how do you count items that are listed as having fewer than 1 carb? Do you just count it as one? I am in a stall and wondering if I am not accounting for enough carbs.
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